1. 04:25 8th Apr 2012

    Notes: 143

    Reblogged from maghrabiyya

     
  2. 03:50

    Notes: 87260

    Reblogged from thecouscousking

    safwangoesham:

m0roccan:

sciatic:

Born on the island of Moloka`i, Hawaii, Zoe is the only known captive white (golden) zebra in existence. You can read more about her here.

I’m sorry but I absolutely despise this. Why the hell is she denied the freedom to be wild and run free just because of how rare she is? I completely object to any captivating of any animal whatsoever.
Hes an albino. ^.^  and ^^^^^ mmmhmm. :(

27,000 notes and no one has asked what the fuck a Zebra is doing in Hawaii anyway?

    safwangoesham:

    m0roccan:

    sciatic:

    Born on the island of Moloka`i, Hawaii, Zoe is the only known captive white (golden) zebra in existence. You can read more about her here.

    I’m sorry but I absolutely despise this. Why the hell is she denied the freedom to be wild and run free just because of how rare she is? I completely object to any captivating of any animal whatsoever.

    Hes an albino. ^.^  and ^^^^^ mmmhmm. :(

    27,000 notes and no one has asked what the fuck a Zebra is doing in Hawaii anyway?

     
  3. 16:13 7th Apr 2012

    Notes: 225

    Reblogged from dynamicafrica

    Tags: shameonmeoflittlefaith

    image: Download

    dynamicafrica:

Another Female President for #Africa
Following the death of #Malawian President Bingu wa Mutharika on Thursday, former Vice-President Joyce Banda has now officially been sworn in as president of the Southern African nation. Banda is the first female president in Southern Africa and is the second female head of state in Africa, after Liberia’s Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf.

And just this morning here I was sure they’ll find a way to swindle her out of the presidency.

    dynamicafrica:

    Another Female President for #Africa

    Following the death of #Malawian President Bingu wa Mutharika on Thursday, former Vice-President Joyce Banda has now officially been sworn in as president of the Southern African nation. Banda is the first female president in Southern Africa and is the second female head of state in Africa, after Liberia’s Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf.

    And just this morning here I was sure they’ll find a way to swindle her out of the presidency.

     
  4. 13:27

    Notes: 300590

    Reblogged from chinuchirai

    image: Download

     
  5. Languages...

    1. Kakwa woman: You speak Arabic? Juba Arabic even?
    2. Me: Well what do you want me to speak?
    3. Kakwa woman: Most white people act all high and mighty with English, like if you don't know English, you don't know anything.
    4. While I do get tired of this dance about speaking the language, there's reasons it always happens
    5. 1. Juba Arabic is neither my language nor hers - I don't speak her language (Kakwa) and she doesn't speak mine (English).
    6. 2. It is no ones first language (except perhaps some of the younger generation); it is a common tongue belonging to no one group.
    7. 3. This idea of no/bad english=no education. Its way too prevalent. Its wrong.
    8. 4. It's not uncommon to find Kenyans/Ugandans/Ethiopians/Eritreans in South Sudan speaking Juba Arabic. In case you didn't know, this is not a language spoken in any of those countries.
    9. 5. It's also not uncommon to find Kenyans/Ugandans/Ethiopians/Eritreans in South Sudan not speaking Juba Arabic. Some pick it up, some don't. Life happens.
    10. 6. I can count on my fingers the number of American/European people I know who can speak Juba Arabic (not counting people I am related to). I'm not setting the fluency bar very high either.
    11. Why?
     
  6. 20:13 3rd Apr 2012

    Notes: 286

    Reblogged from mydarkenedeyes

    mydarkenedeyes:

By Vanessa Tam
     
  7. 02:31

    Notes: 6

    Reblogged from thefemaletyrant

     
  8. 00:51

    Notes: 6811

    Reblogged from ethiopienne

    In college, I used to underline sentences that struck me, that made me look up from the page. They were not necessarily the same sentences the professors pointed out, which would turn up for further explication on an exam. I noted them for their clarity, their rhythm, their beauty and their enchantment. For surely it is a magical thing for a handful of words, artfully arranged, to stop time. To conjure a place, a person, a situation, in all its specificity and dimensions. To affect us and alter us, as profoundly as real people and things do.
    — Jhumpa Lahiri, My Life’s Sentences (via azspot)
     
  9. 22:56 2nd Apr 2012

    Notes: 9

    Reblogged from dynamicafrica

    image: Download

    dynamicafrica:


“Thousands of Sudanese artisans have welcomed a new law restricting foreign artisans who dominate the local art market, making it less profitable for the locals.

Over the years, the country’s art market has been in the hands of foreigners, because the country has not invested much in the arts. To avert this, the country has moved to support Sudanese artisans through social and health welfare provision and even training sessions to hone their skills.

Before the secession of the South Sudan, most of the country’s artisans hailed from the South. Departure of over 2.5 Million South Sudanese living in the North before their independence last July left the market to foreigners, something that led to rise in prices of handicrafts such as wooden carvings, leather bags and shoes.”

via ohyeahsudan

Congratulations to Sudanese artisans for this oppportunity. Better to be learning how to make beautiful things than joining the Popular Defense Force. But you must realize that this law is targeted at South Sudanese living in the North. That’s who the foreigners are here. Those who didn’t leave, perhaps because they couldn’t find a way to, or perhaps because they had a small business making handicrafts and they didn’t want to pack all that up and leave. Now that livelihood is being taken away from them since as of July 2011 they are foreigners dominating the local art market. Separation is messy.

    dynamicafrica:

    Thousands of Sudanese artisans have welcomed a new law restricting foreign artisans who dominate the local art market, making it less profitable for the locals.

    Over the years, the country’s art market has been in the hands of foreigners, because the country has not invested much in the arts. To avert this, the country has moved to support Sudanese artisans through social and health welfare provision and even training sessions to hone their skills.

    Before the secession of the South Sudan, most of the country’s artisans hailed from the South. Departure of over 2.5 Million South Sudanese living in the North before their independence last July left the market to foreigners, something that led to rise in prices of handicrafts such as wooden carvings, leather bags and shoes.

    via ohyeahsudan

    Congratulations to Sudanese artisans for this oppportunity. Better to be learning how to make beautiful things than joining the Popular Defense Force. But you must realize that this law is targeted at South Sudanese living in the North. That’s who the foreigners are here. Those who didn’t leave, perhaps because they couldn’t find a way to, or perhaps because they had a small business making handicrafts and they didn’t want to pack all that up and leave. Now that livelihood is being taken away from them since as of July 2011 they are foreigners dominating the local art market. Separation is messy.

     
  10. 22:21

    Notes: 13

    Reblogged from ohyeahsudan

    image: Download

    Kisra! Now I’m hungry

    Kisra! Now I’m hungry

    (Source: nsfcom)